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From the Editor-in-Chief of SOA World Magazine

Sean Rhody

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Top Stories by Sean Rhody

To paraphrase, "I come not to praise the Browser, but to bury it." Because the cold hard fact of application development is that the browser needs to die. Immediately. It's already caused more than enough damage. This may seem to be a harsh statement. After all, the browser was responsible for the explosion of the Internet. It serves many useful purposes and people do billions of dollars worth of business through it every year. Seemingly, I should be praising the browser, not calling for its execution. Nevertheless, the browser needs to go, and we all know it. It's the dirty secret of the IT world, one we never like to talk about - as a mechanism for delivering a GUI, the browser stinks. Stinks isn't even a strong enough word. The browser was intended to deliver text across the Internet, and it's good at that. So good that people began to piggyback other things onto... (more)

Get the Message

Back in the old days, when you needed to communicate with someone distant, you usually had to send a letter. There was no instant response, and there was no way to tell when your message was received. Now we have always-on e-mail, BlackBerrys, and assorted other devices to make what was once a leisurely (or agonizingly slow) process instantaneous, and synchronous. This issue is about the battle of two idioms - instant, synchronous communication, as championed by the Remote Procedure Call; and asynchronous communication (which may still be instantaneous, but doesn't have to be), ... (more)

i-Technology Viewpoint: Open Wounds – How Free May End Up Being Costly

Like many people in the industry, I'm torn over open source software. I'm not opposed to developers creating software and deciding they do it for the love of programming, and have no need for payment - if they want to give their work away, I see no reason why they shouldn't be able to do so, although I think the people who want all software to be free should first get uniform agreement from everyone in the industry to work for nothing before they get on that soapbox. Even though I run a magazine in my spare time, I make my living designing software, and I personally don't want to... (more)

SOA World Editorial — (Over) Due Process

Sometimes it seems like it takes forever for new technology to be adopted, and even when a technology goes mainstream, it seems as if people cling to the old ways long after a better way has been shown. Heck, I drive a car but still have a couple of horses - sometimes you just want the old and familiar around. Most of us are familiar with the famous Gartner Hype curve as well, which describes the adoption of a new technology in phases, from the build up of talk about a new standard (the start of the hype), through early users to widespread adoption. I suppose the steady state sh... (more)

Adding A Middle Tier to Your Java Code Using Jaguar CTS

Two Tier vs N-Tier Client/server applications, and even Java applications that call a database directly, represent the original, two-tiered application architecture. This architecture fits many needs, but often there is a penalty - the need to redevelop or copy code from one application to another as it is developed. More importantly, although Java is certainly a significant language for development, it's a recently developed one, and much of the logic that we need to use is written in other languages. Distributed applications, be they Web applets or standalone applications, also... (more)