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From the Editor-in-Chief of SOA World Magazine

Sean Rhody

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Top Stories by Sean Rhody

Like many people in the industry, I'm torn over open source software. I'm not opposed to developers creating software and deciding they do it for the love of programming, and have no need for payment - if they want to give their work away, I see no reason why they shouldn't be able to do so, although I think the people who want all software to be free should first get uniform agreement from everyone in the industry to work for nothing before they get on that soapbox. Even though I run a magazine in my spare time, I make my living designing software, and I personally don't want to do it for free. I'm not opposed to people who want to develop for fun, or for the pure joy of programming. Lots of students in college do this, and many hardcore programmers who don't get enough code during the day seem to grind it out after hours as well. Eventually though, the economics ca... (more)

The Last Mile in SOA - Taming the User Interface

Last month I wrote about the future, what might be ahead for SOA and beyond, focusing significantly on user interfaces. This month I'm still thinking about user interfaces and the impact they have on the final judge of any SOA project - the end user. If you've read my editorials over the past few years, you're aware I'm an absolute opponent of the browser as a means of delivering applications. I think it's terrific at what it's made for - delivering content - and has been extended in ways that make it something its original inventors never dreamed of, but at the end of the day, ... (more)

i-Technology Viewpoint: Death to the Browser

To paraphrase, "I come not to praise the Browser, but to bury it." Because the cold hard fact of application development is that the browser needs to die. Immediately. It's already caused more than enough damage. This may seem to be a harsh statement. After all, the browser was responsible for the explosion of the Internet. It serves many useful purposes and people do billions of dollars worth of business through it every year. Seemingly, I should be praising the browser, not calling for its execution. Nevertheless, the browser needs to go, and we all know it. It's the dirty sec... (more)

Get the Message

Back in the old days, when you needed to communicate with someone distant, you usually had to send a letter. There was no instant response, and there was no way to tell when your message was received. Now we have always-on e-mail, BlackBerrys, and assorted other devices to make what was once a leisurely (or agonizingly slow) process instantaneous, and synchronous. This issue is about the battle of two idioms - instant, synchronous communication, as championed by the Remote Procedure Call; and asynchronous communication (which may still be instantaneous, but doesn't have to be), ... (more)

My Forte

My Forté Here's an old joke. A guy in a strange town needs to get a haircut. There're only two barbers in the town, but the guy doesn't know either of them. Which one does he pick? The answer is the guy with the worst haircut. Why? Because neither barber can cut his own hair, so the guy with the worst haircut is the better barber. What's this got to do with Java? Well, it reminds me of the strange position that Sun has been in for the past several years. I think Java is one of the most profound software concepts to ever come along, and there's no question that Sun is the proud o... (more)