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From the Editor-in-Chief of SOA World Magazine

Sean Rhody

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Top Stories by Sean Rhody

As a student of physics, Albert Einstein is one of my personal heroes. Aside from being one of the most brilliant minds to ever contemplate the universe, Albert had a way with words. One of his quotes strikes me as particularly apropos for this month's issue - "Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius - and a lot of courage - to move in the opposite direction." This month we're focusing on two subjects that actually tie in together much more than most people actually anticipate - SOA Testing and Service Design. I'll get to how they tie together in a moment, but let's see how Einstein relates to SOA first. With SOA, it's very easy to buy the plumbing. You go out and get an ESB, a rules engine, something to do BPEL or BPML, and something to do basic services management and you're ready to tackle that great... (more)

Why Superman Works Alone

Toward the end of the last Batman movie, when Robin is giving Batman a hard time, George Clooney gets fed up and says, "This is why Superman works alone." While I'm often tempted to think along the same lines, the reality of our business is that we work in teams. This leads to the topic of this month's diatribe: team development. Large-scale software development is a complex process. The majority of it takes place in a corporate environment that requires rigor and process. The most familiar of these processes is usually the task of obtaining the blessing of the DBA for your datab... (more)

Web Services & WebLogic

The Web services world is currently cluttered with code-intensive solutions that require intimate knowledge of lower-level protocols to successfully deploy applications as Web services. Much like the initial situation of the World Wide Web, when a detailed knowledge of the HTML specification was crucial to successful publishing, Web services is mired in UDDI, WSDL, and SOAP. These protocols are important, but just as Notepad was replaced (at least for most developers) by more productive tools such as Dreamweaver, or even FrontPage, so is the landscape of Web services evolving wit... (more)

Pattern Matching

When I first graduated (well, actually, the second time) I had an offer from a company for a programming job. They were going to hire me, contingent upon my passing the IBM Programmer's Aptitude Test. So one day I drove my college junk heap an hour out of my way to take this test. I had to get an "A" to get the job. I was nervous, but once I got the test, I realized I needn't have worried - it was all about patterns. It's both a relief and a disappointment in the programming business that nothing is really new. We keep solving the same old problems, sometimes in new ways, or wit... (more)

Flying South

My neighborhood is home to a host of birds, many of which fly south during the winter months. With spring in bloom, I always look forward to the return of the various avian travelers who dart and weave all over the open fields near my home. That's the kind of migration I look forward to. In the software world, there's a less appealing form of migration, one we can never truly get away from. That's the migration of code and servers from one version to the next. Some migration efforts have been a direct result of the evolution of the EJB and J2EE specifications. In the earliest inc... (more)